Thursday, 6 September 2007

Yikes, is it the yips?

Yesterday’s disaster was compounded by an attack of putting nerves. I’m not sure if this is true ‘yips’ but it’s bad enough. I can do long putts, but if there’s anything at all at stake, short putts defeat me. I don’t think I’ll abandon my White Hot Odyssey putter, but replies on the Golf Monthly Forum have reminded me of a number of things to try, including changing my grip. A lot of people find that putting with the left hand lower lessens interference from the wrists, though in my case I think the interference may be from the brain! Still, the effort of concentrating on a new stroke might be enough to drive out the demons.
Whatever I decide, the main thing is to practise more, especially before a round. Of course I’m not alone with putting problems. Monty is notorious for losing things on the green. I know how he feels, but can’t help feeling he has less excuse than me for not practising!
Picture credits here

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I suggest that you don't yet change your grip but instead try first using only the top hand (your left if your are right handed) to control the putter both on the back swing and throughswing. In other words, take the pressure from the lower hand out of it completely. Use your top hand for control. One handed control I believe removes confusion between the hands. try it and see. Your top hand is what should be used primarily in most iron and wood shots. The lowere should not be active as this may undermine the active control of the top hand. Make sense? Well, it does it for me.

Green Goddess said...

Good tip. I've had to concentrate on using my 'top' arm more with irons too. I'm now having some success with breathing while putting -! Which I'll explain sometime soon on the blog.

peeeer-erik said...

I got a new putting game after reading Pelz' Putting Bible. It's important to have a strategy. To me getting a two-ball putter also helped a lot.

Green Goddess said...

Good to hear from you. Thanks for the tips!

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